ROUND ONE: 2-lodged vs. 15-narcotize


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Things to Consider in Making a Choice:

  • How well the poem incorporates the authlete’s assigned word.
  • Technical elements: meter, rhyme, form, shape, and other poetic standards.
  • Creativity: wordplay, imagery, unusual approach, etc.
  • Subtle elements that make the whole greater than the sum of its parts.
  • Your overall response: emotional reaction such as admiration, tears, laughter, terror, or some indefinable feeling.

Here are the poems:

2-lodged
A Stink By Any Other Name
By Cara Slavens

Penelope the Garden Pig, always liked to say
“Go out and smell the roses each and every single day.”

She often had her friends to tea, her parties were so quaint.
Sometimes the guests were hard to please and offered this complaint:

“Trout and Skunk are rather ripe. They’re stinking up the place!
The only way to breathe in here is to cover up your face.”

“But Skunk does not smell bad,” Pig said, “and neither does dear Trout.
Perhaps because there’re rose petals lodged inside my snout.”

vs.

15-narcotize
I Slumber to Numbers
By Eric Ode

I slumber to numbers. They sing me to sleep.
One page of equations, I’m soon counting sheep.
I doze to division and multiplication.
The stacking of fractions can cause hibernation.
Subtractions and factors will daze and deflate me,
tranquilize, narcotize, soundly sedate me.
But, oh, here we go with a 7 times 4,
a 20 plus 12, and a 10 minus. . . snore!

 




2-lodged vs. 15-narcotize

  • 2-lodged (Cara Slavens) (9%, 14 Votes)
  • 15-narcotize (Eric Ode) (91%, 136 Votes)

Total Voters: 150

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  • http://www.ericode.com Eric Ode

    Step One: Find a dictionary. Step Two: Convince oneself there is any way of using this word in a child-friendly poem.

  • http://www.katyaczaja.com/ Katya

    That’s a doozie!

  • http://www.ericode.com Eric Ode

    My new plan of attack: Play Spider Solitaire and hope my word mysteriously changes to something else while I’m not looking.

  • http://www.thinkkidthink.com Ed DeCaria

    Eric, you are the lucky beneficiary of my (wife’s) decision last year to NOT use “narcotic” as a 16-seed.

    I think 15-narcotize is much more manageable.

    You are free to disagree! (And then write your poem anyways, of course.)

  • http://susantaylorbrown.com Susan Taylor Brown

    Wow, Eric. Maybe I need to send to the poetic pixie dust. Ugh. But I think I would rather have narcotize than my espouse. And oh yeah, kid friendly. Double ugh.

  • http://kraftyellenwrites.com Kathy Ellen Davis

    You can do it, Eric! (also, good luck at spider solitaire!)

  • Cara Slavens

    I know you’ll kill it, though. (the poem, not the solitaire. Well, maybe that, too.)

  • http://www.ericode.com Eric Ode

    Thanks so much, Cara! Looking forward to seeing what lodged idea you free into the universe!

  • http://www.ericode.com Eric Ode

    Done. Submitted. Committed. Feeling slow-witted. Hoping to be acquitted.

  • http://www.quinettecook.com Quinette Cook

    Solitaire is a great way to let ideas come to you. Or procrastinate. I’m sure there’s something lodged up there that you’ll shake loose. Oh, wait, that’s Cara’s word.

  • http://www.poetrytalents.com Gloson Teh

    Awww man Eric. You didn’t start your poem with a 3-word exclamation. Nonetheless, I loved it! The rhythm was superb and easy to pick up. :D

  • http://www.pennyklostermann.com Penny Klostermann

    What a match-up! Both are so great!

  • http://www.dorainebennett.com Doraine Bennett

    Narcotize! Good job!

  • http://www.quinettecook.com Quinette Cook

    These are two of my favorites so far. Both had a nice sense of rhythm and rhyme. (I guess solitaire works!)

  • http://www.buffysilverman.com Buffy Silverman

    Yes, great rhythm and rhyme in both. “Tranquilize, narcotize, soundly sedate me,”….that’s a terrific line.

  • http://susantaylorbrown.com Susan Taylor Brown

    Cheers to both of you on this pair of terrific poems! Cara, I could so picture the images in your poem. Yours too, Eric, plus you managed to make me laugh over math, not an easy thing to do.

  • http://jlielarios.blogspot.com Julie Larios

    Oh, ouch – this is the hardest decision so far. Love both – a memorable pig with rose. petals up her snout, a tranquilized/narcotized/sedated scholar. Well done, poets!

  • Heidi Mordhorst

    Eric scores a home run with a poem that trips effortlessly off the tongue, has an awesome premise and first line, and then teaches the meaning of “narcotize” to anyone who didn’t know it.

  • http://readingyear.blogspot.com Mary Lee

    A pig snout vs. number-slumber. The directions these poems go will never cease to amaze me!

  • http://www.poemfarm.amylv.com Amy Ludwig VanDerwater

    Giggles all around on this one! I tip my hat to both poems and have a feeling they’ll be coming back into my head….

  • http://www.debbielacroix.com Debbie LaCroix

    Eric– You did a math poem!!!! ;-)

  • http://www.robynhoodblack.com Robyn Hood Black

    Clever, clever – both poems! Eric, I’d been wondering about “narcotize” since I first saw it in the line-up… you nailed it (tipping hat…).

  • http://www.childrensauthorbjlee.com B.J. Lee

    Very clever, you two!

  • Cara Slavens

    Well played songster-poet! I feel like Western Ky. vs. Gonzaga. Well, I must say while practicing for the madness, I’ve had the most fun writing that I’ve had in a long time. I will be following your madness adventures and routing for you. After all, “Eric” said backwards is “Cara.”

  • http://tanitasdavis.com tanita

    If your last name is Ode, I’m pretty sure there’s an unfair advantage somewhere…!

    WELL DONE, both.

  • http://www.ericode.com Eric Ode

    Cara, I’m so glad to hear you’re enjoying the process. My small worry in this “competition” is that some would get discouraged and decide poetry is simply not their thing. You obviously know what you’re doing and have a good sense of how to tickle a funny bone. Stick with it!

  • Carrie Finison

    Cara, I totally agree. Win or lose, I did so much writing this week that I wouldn’t otherwise have done. It was a fun and very productive week for me and that is the real “win” of the contest.

  • Domd

    Did anyone else notice that Eric posted his math poem on Pi Day (3.14)? That alone gets my vote, aside from the fact that it was incredible!

  • Hannah Ruth Wilde

    I have to say, if anyone could do anything with narcotize, they get my vote. Still, the reason I love march madness is because the poetry is so good. Cara, I loved it. Ed, you’re nuts for allowing this word – keep up the good work!!!

  • http://www.thinkkidthink.com Ed DeCaria

    I just want to acknowledge Cara’s work here — she managed to create a complete (and funny) short story/dialogue in verse in only 8 lines. Unfortunately for her she matched up against Eric, who contributed a tight — dare I say perfect? — poem using one of the hardest words of the round.

    Thank you, both!

  • http://www.pennyklostermann.com Penny Klostermann

    I agree Ed! This matchup was amazing!

  • http://www.ericode.com Eric Ode

    Thanks again for the match-up, Cara. Here’s hoping we find ourselves back at TKT in 2014!

  • Janet F.

    Eric, I had my doubts about narcotize but you used it brilliantly in a poem that would be fun to know by heart!! Plus it does get the meaning out to kids in a very acceptable way. Lovely!!! And Cara wonderful poem, too. Cute story poem about Penelope the Pig and her rose petals!!! Congratulations to you both. Isn’t MMPoetry barrels of fun and angst all rolled into one?? (Well, more work for you outstanding authletes, but some fans worry about the words and the tough voting decisions, too!!!)