#MMPoetry 2014: Round 3 Words Unveiled

Congratulations to all sixteen of our Round 2 winners! They now make up this year’s “Sweet Sixteen”!

For their talent and effort, they are again rewarded with … YET ANOTHER WORD THAT NEEDS TO BE TURNED INTO A POEM. STARTING NOW:

Here are your words! They are listed in the order that your names appear on the official bracket.

HUMOR REGION

16-eviscerate (Margo Lemieux)
vs.
5-suited (Jean Daigneau)

14-insubordinate (Darren Sardelli)
vs.
15-pseudonymous (B.J. Lee)

EMPATHY REGION

8-minutiae (Jane Yolen)
vs.
4-buoyant (Elizabeth McBride)

6-flagrant (Buffy Silverman)
vs.
15-nomenclature (Karyn Linnell)

LOGIC REGION

16-professorial (Miranda Paul)
vs.
13-desiccant (J.J. Close)

14-rigidity (Allan Wolf)
vs.
10-largesse (Kristen Foote)

PASSION REGION

16-quotidian (Lori Degman)
vs.
13-accoutrements (Samuel W. Kent)

3-waif (Victoria Warneck)
vs.
10-quorum (Ally Keenan)

Poems are due by 10:00am Central Daylight Time on Thursday, March 27th.

Authletes, the poem length limit for Round 3 is now sixteen (16) lines. See the full Authlete Instructions for more information. Post your questions there.

Enjoy the madness …

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  • Ldegman

    Good luck everyone!!

  • Elizabeth McBride

    Good luck everyone!

  • Kristen Foote

    Here we go!! Pen and thesaurus are ready… let’s do this!!! :) I am so excited to see what you all come up with – this round is going to be a good one!

    • Allan Wolf

      Your comment shows great largesse, Kristen!

  • http://www.thinkkidthink.com/ Ed DeCaria

    I’m still bummed I don’t get to assign anyone the word “orifices” — and with all of these high seeds, too. What a shame. Stupid self-created algorithm …

    • http://www.glosonblog.com Gloson

      It’s okay Ed. I’ll have a go.

      How To Stop Snoring

      All snorers, now heed my advice:
      Close your mouth! (So it won’t welcome flies.)
      Breathe through your nose orifices.
      Then your loud snore it fixes!
      Don’t you agree this is wise? ;)

      • http://www.thinkkidthink.com/ Ed DeCaria

        Alright, somebody took the bait! Anyone else?

        • http://www.glosonblog.com Gloson

          Darn it, you baiter!
          I’ll get you back later!

          • Allan Wolf

            Gloson, you’re sounding
            a lot like Darth Vader!

            • http://www.glosonblog.com Gloson

              Probably ’cause
              I have eaten a tater,
              that’s grown in the Dark Side,
              served by a Sith waiter.

            • Allan Wolf

              Aaaaagh, stop, Gloson, Stop!
              You’re the greater debater.
              You make me feel like a second-rater.
              See you later!

            • http://www.glosonblog.com Gloson

              Alligator! :)

            • Ryan Stockton

              Poetry nerds. Gotta love’em.

        • rjschechter

          This is my my ear, and this is my nose.
          This is my mouth, where the ice cream goes!
          And if you are curious what *this* is,
          let’s just say (ahem) it’s one more of my orifices.

    • Allan Wolf

      I have actually written poems about, not just one but, THREE different orifices that are actually published in a book of anatomy poems, The Blood-Hungry Spleen and Other Poems About Our Parts (Candlewick Press). Further proof that you can write a kids’ poem about literally ANYthing.

      • http://www.glosonblog.com Gloson

        Ahh, but did you use the word “orifices” or “orifice”? :P

        • Allan Wolf

          No. I never actually use the word “orifice” singular or plural. (Allan makes sad dejection face of shame.)

    • http://www.glosonblog.com Gloson

      So someone decided to be annoying and inform me the plural of orifice should be orificia. sighh.

      • http://www.thinkkidthink.com/ Ed DeCaria

        I think that’s only for medical dictionaries. In general dictionaries, I think you’d see orifices.

    • Rebekah Hoeft

      Hey, Ed! This is brilliant! What do you think about throwing out a word you couldn’t use after each round–it’s like a decompression chamber for the authletes who don’t advance–a chance to still use these crazy words, but without the pressure!
      Here’s my attempt–forgive the liberties this authlete takes with rhyming and meter! Editing has gone out the window since…ahem. Not winning! (:
      Poem’s Birth
      Sights and sound, smells, tastes and touches
      Bombard my mind’s orifices.
      I take them in, digest with thought;
      They rattle ’round and seep back out
      Through words and pictures I create.
      I have no choice, the need is great
      To let them out, my mind unload.
      They can’t stay in, I might explode!

      • http://www.thinkkidthink.com/ Ed DeCaria

        Every round there is at least one word that I want to assign that doesn’t qualify — inappropriate, too long, already used in an #MMPoetry poem before, etc. I could potentially do what you’re suggesting. There’s no shortage of words, I assure you!

      • http://www.glosonblog.com Gloson

        Nice poem, Rebekah! You incorporated the word “orifices” very nicely. :)

        • Rebekah Hoeft

          Thanks, Gloson! I thought yours was mighty fine as well!

      • Rebekah Hoeft

        Should clarify (after rereading my post): Ed is brilliant. Not I. (:

  • Vikram Madan

    These look like some pretty tough words overall. Best of luck everyone – can’t wait to see your poems!

  • http://motherstreusel.com/ Mother Streusel

    Buffy, I think there has been some sort of mix-up and I got the word intended for you ;) I guess I’ll have to make the best of being assigned a word my opponent is much more familiar with than myself. Best of luck to you. I’m excited. I think our match-up will be a lot of fun.

  • http://motherstreusel.com/ Mother Streusel

    Oh, can I mention that I am SOOOO excited about the limit being 16 lines instead of 8!!!

  • Rebekah Hoeft

    Happy writing, everyone! Can’t wait to see what you come up with! Very fun words, Ed!

  • Quinette Cook

    Congratulations to all the Round 3 authletes. I will be jeering, er, cheering from the sidelines.

    • http://www.glosonblog.com Gloson

      err…. Freudian slip? =P

  • Debra Shumaker

    Congrats to all of you moving on! Looking forward to seeing the new poems – lots of tough words there!

  • julie krantz

    Good luck to the Sweet 16!

  • Ryan Stockton

    Nice words. Should be a good round. The kids reading these are going to have the biggest vocabulary in the world.

  • Joe Mohr

    Good luck to all–my money is on Samuel Kent! He really shines in this competition. 2 things about that statement–1. I am not betting money on this tournament. 2. I think you’re all terrific poets, but in a tournament you HAVE to pick a winner and I pick Samuel :)

    • Quinette Cook

      He’s one of my faves too. I think it’s the pooka in him.

    • http://www.thinkkidthink.com/ Ed DeCaria

      So … Joe’s comment brings up an interesting topic.

      How would everyone feel about letting the public submit their own round-by-round picks, as is so often done for the basketball tournament? So, when the bracket is unveiled initially — everyone goes through and researches the authletes (great opportunity to get traffic to all of your websites), looks at the seeds, and decides who they think will win each matchup from Round 1 through Round 6. Points are awarded for each correct prediction (more points awarded in later rounds). And we can give top 1-3 predictors a prize of some sort.

      • http://motherstreusel.com/ Mother Streusel

        I think that sounds really fun, but I’m a bit nervous about it. All the Authletes competing would have to be really confident and a little bit emotionally detached from their work and from their audience. Honestly, I have a feeling a lot of poets tend to be sensitive, hard on themselves, and connected to their work and audience. I think it can be tough enough being a good winner or loser and seeing people’s predictions beforehand might erode confidence, bring discouragement, or make someone feel nervous that they had to live up to high expectations. Imagine being the favorite and losing! It might feel doubly disappointing. While I love traffic, I’m not sure this would be worth it to me.

        • http://motherstreusel.com/ Mother Streusel

          I would probably still compete if this were the case, and I wouldn’t complain about it publicly, but if you are asking, that is my opinion. Also…I really like the sense of camaraderie in this event. Knowing that people were for or against you in advance might cause that to deteriorate a bit.

        • http://www.thinkkidthink.com/ Ed DeCaria

          Authletes would not see aggregate prediction results, necessarily. I could do that, but that would not be the purpose. The purpose would be 1) give fans a reason to learn more about each authlete (good for all of you!); 2) give fans something else fun to do in the context of the event and win a prize in the process. The drawback as I see it would be that people would vote for whoever they predicted, regardless of the poems produced after the fact. But my guess is also that only a small minority of people would actually submit prediction sheets in advance, so this would not overly impact the Public Vote.

          • http://motherstreusel.com/ Mother Streusel

            Interesting points. I was thinking that Authletes would make predictions as well. If it is just the public, then I think that could possibly pose less problems. I hadn’t thought about the way it might effect how people vote…and possibly people who have predicted might work hard to get other people to vote for who they picked. Traffic, great. Possibly inaccurate vote…not so great. The public vote is already a bit…um…swayable, so maybe that wouldn’t matter too much. I guess my final response is that I still have some hesitation, but if it significantly increased the enjoyability for participants and drew a lot more traffic, it would probably be worth it.

        • http://closejj.wix.com/meretricktheworm Josh Close

          I like being the underdog though, the little pawn that takes down the king.

          Would be interesting to do, most of us are pretty good sports. Could maybe make it an optional thing that an authlete wouldn’t have to view or something, if they’d be sensitive about it.

          • http://motherstreusel.com/ Mother Streusel

            I think being the underdog is fine, as long as being the underdog doesn’t actually make it harder for the underdog to win. In a horse race, being the underdog doesn’t affect the race. In this, it might.

            • http://closejj.wix.com/meretricktheworm Josh Close

              At the same time, it could potentially go the other way as well. I tend to lean towards the underdog in a situation that is tough to decide.

              I think that it’d be interesting to try this – but maybe make it be just for fun. When there is a prize on the line, that could potentially sway the votes slightly. Probably not enough to make too big of a difference though… Many authletes self-promote enough to get quite a few public votes as is. I feel as though there’d be some people that I could have potentially gone up against thus far and potentially will go up against that I would just write off the public vote as a possibility and shoot for the authlete and classroom vote.

              I say go for it, just for fun – it would bring more people to the poets websites, etc. Making it just for fun, you could potentially allow authletes to make predictions as well.

            • http://motherstreusel.com/ Mother Streusel

              If I am the only one that has objections, and it isn’t the Authletes making the predictions, then why not. In all honesty, I thought I would be speaking for a lot of people…I tend to not be afraid to speak up or ask questions and I thought if someone felt sensitive or shy they might appreciate that someone else suggested it might be uncomfortable to know in advance if people aren’t rooting for you…however it looks as if I were overly concerned with feelings that other people don’t actually have. My mistake. I’ll be fine with whatever. I’m opinionated and bold, but not inflexible or stubborn. And I’m sensitive, but not THAT sensitive…and even if I were, I get over things.

      • Joe Mohr

        I like it. I think this thing just keeps getting better. Another good idea for next year–a first round bye for me so I can see what it’s like to be in the second round :)

    • http://www.glosonblog.com Gloson

      Yes, Samuel is definitely one of my favorites! He’ll definitely win! (unless Lori puts him to shame this round. =P)

  • http://www.thinkkidthink.com/ Ed DeCaria

    As a reminder, the entire reason for the Authlete Vote and the Classroom Vote this year was to minimize the impact of the more readily influenced Public Vote. I explained all of this in my GROWING PAINS post (http://www.thinkkidthink.com/march-madness-poetry-growing-pains/) after #MMPoetry 2013. I invite everyone to re(read) that. Kinda nice to see how much of what was hypothesized in that post has come true in #MMPoetry 2014.

    • Miranda Paul

      Hey Ed, do you think the fact that the MMPoetry is during a lot of classroom “Spring Break” weeks that it makes a difference? My son was off all last week, my daughter this week. Maybe more classrooms would be involved if it were one week earlier (or later, spilling further into National Poetry Month?). But alas, I am only thinking out loud. On the internet.

      • http://www.thinkkidthink.com/ Ed DeCaria

        This year is one week later than it would normally be. Only because I had a three-day work conference March 10th-12th!

  • Darren Sardelli

    Ed, thanks for the new word! Just the word alone, gave me tons of ideas for the poem. I really enjoyed writing this one!!!

  • Miranda Paul

    These words sure are difficult. Good luck, everyone!

    • http://closejj.wix.com/meretricktheworm Josh Close

      Thought my word was tough till I read some of the others!

  • Darren Sardelli

    Hey Ed – I’m giving you a word.
    Write a poem with the word – extemporaneous

    Good luck!

  • Jane Yolen

    Hi all–you sure are a wordy lot. I would have been in here first with all the congrats but, as Ed knows, I was in the emergency room at our local hospital and then in the ICU for an interesting combo of gallstone passing and liver problems due to (who know) overdosing on Tylenol for back pain. And I stil got my poem for MM in on time. ALl this means is I’d rather be writing poetry than eating hospital food or being punctured by the vampiric phlebotomists. (Say those last two words ten times fast!)

    Hailstones hit you on the head.
    Gallstones put you right to bed.
    Liver fails you, hail assails you,
    So I wrote my poem ‘fore I woke up dead.

    But here in the land of the living, I congratulate all, wait for the poems to be posted, and if my pain-scribed poem doesn’t win me a place in the next round, I shall haunt you all, and continue to vote.

    • Rebekah Hoeft

      ): So sorry you’re not feeling great. Praying for your quick recovery! Way to get your poem written and turned in–I’m certain I could not have powered through gallstone pain to write poetry!

  • Damon Dean

    ABSCESS IN ABSENTIA

    I cast not a vote in Round 3,
    due (Jane) to a minor surgery:
    my nephew’s–not mine–
    so tho I’m doing fine,
    I was dying all your poems to see.

    My nephew’s large cyst was extracted,
    but my wi-fi was not well enacted,
    so I just spent the day
    without much I could say,
    and just commented after the fact, Ed.